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Manufacturing of the mouse

Production (soldering and assembling)

The actual manufacturing of our mice, such as soldering and assembly, is taking place in the ‘Integrationswerkstatt’ Retex (a repair and assembling shop that includes disabled people) in Regensburg. Both the electronics department as well as the assembly and packaging department are managing industrial orders on a routine basis. The working conditions there are decidedly humane. For instance, the working hours and task lists have been adapted to the individual needs and skills of the workers. Moreover, there is an active employee representative committee.

To get an idea about how the production of a mouse looks like, here are a few pictures from our supplying factories

Individual components

The example of the cable production shows the huge efforts that need to be done to produce a single component. The pictures are taken in factories we are in talks with.
Production of the cable harness is mainly being automatized.

Production of USB plugs from metal strips, including lots of automatized work as well. Mainly quality check is done manually.

In an third factory plugs and cable harnesses are being soldered and finally assembled manually.

The smallest components (resistors, capacitors, switches etc.) are being manufactured in several different factories (s. supply chain), in large part by machines. Some pictures from other site:

Leiterplatte

Production of the circuit board in Southern Germany

SMD Widerstände

Production of SMD resistors in Teltow (Berlin)

Holzscrollrad

Sample production of our wooden scroll wheel

And finally the casing: For our casing, we need a casting mould, plastic and dye, and workers who know how to operate the machines. Like our first supplies of casings in Landshut:

Raw material

For the production of our mouse, we need plenty of raw materials mainly metalls and plastics/ crude oil. The following pictures show the production of our soldering wire made from metalls, chemiclas and resin. (Copyright: Stannol)